Titanic & Liner Memorabilia Auction
on Saturday 17th April 2021
Viewing is strictly by appointment on Thursday and Friday prior to the sale.
Lots: 198-244 of 248
Buyer's Premium at our standard rate(s) plus VAT is payable on all purchases.
Additional fees could also be applicable to certain lots. For further information see the full lot details page by clicking the thumbnail image of the relevant lot.
Lot 198
R.M.S. TITANIC: Interesting letter written on board R.M.S. Lanfranc, dated May 9th 1912, by Stafford Dodds. He mentions 'I was ill myself after hearing the news of the Titanic, I knew them all (the officers) it is too horrible.' Also included is a second letter to the same recipient, Miss Marie Woods, dated February 28th 1912. (2)
Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 199
R.M.S. TITANIC: Soft cover 1913 Titanic relief fund Scheme of Administration.

Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 200
R.M.S. TITANIC: Post-disaster postcard of ill-fated Titanic. Postally used April 22nd 1912 W.T. Gaines, Leeds.

Estimate:  £150 - 250 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 201
R.M.S. TITANIC: Post disaster postcard of the ill-fated liner with related message dated April 22nd 1912. The author states 'Well this is the one that made history, everyone here feels as if personally bereaved'.
Estimate:  £150 - 200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 202
R.M.S. TITANIC: FGO Stuart postcard of Titanic at sea, plus Beagles real photo card of Titanic leaving Southampton.

Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 203
R.M.S. OLYMPIC: Unusual St. Paul/St. Louis postcard, postally used September 6th 1912 "And glad to say the Olympic arrived at New York on September 4th at 4.30pm".
Estimate:  £80 - 120 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 204
R.M.S. TITANIC: S.W. Robbins of Bristol postcard of Titanic.
Estimate:  £80 - 120 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 205
R.M.S. TITANIC: G. D. Courtney memorial postcard signed by survivor. "S.S. Titanic" leaving Southampton on her maiden voyage April 10, 1912. RP, G. D. Courtney, Used (Bradwell, Isle of Wight, 17-07-1912) and S.S. Titanic Nearer My God to Thee! Printed, National Series, un-used (signed by Titanic survivor B.V. Dean).
Estimate:  £150 - 250 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 206
R.M.S. TITANIC: Post-disaster postcards of the ill-fated Titanic.
Estimate:  £150 - 250 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 207
R.M.S. TITANIC: Post-disaster bookpost Hurst and Co, real photo postcard, plus another of the Olympic. (2)
Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 208
R.M.S. TITANIC: Philco Publishing Company photo card of Titanic and Olympic 'The World's Greatest Gantry' bordered by shamrocks.

Estimate:  £150 - 250 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 209
R.M.S. TITANIC: Post-disaster postcards. (4)

Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 210
R.M.S. TITANIC: Real photo postcards of the World's Greatest Gantry at Harland & Wolff showing Titanic and Olympic (2). Plus, one other of the Great Unsinkable Titanic.
Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 211
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual artist's postcard of Titanic at sea, plus one other pre-disaster postcard. (Both discoloured) (2)
Estimate:  £150 - 250 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 212
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual pre-disaster nautical photo agency real photo postcard of Titanic leaving Southampton.

Estimate:  £300 - 500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 213
R.M.S. TITANIC: Rare Bryant and May Olympic and Titanic match label (largest steamers in the world building), plus another post-disaster Olympic example. 6½ins.

Estimate:  £150 - 250 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 214
R.M.S. TITANIC: Programme for dramatic operatic matinee performance in aid of Titanic Disaster Fund May 1912.

Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 215
OCEAN LINER: R.M.S. Titanic Inc, International Mercantile Co, and Cunard Steam Ship Company stock certificates. (4)

Estimate:  £40 - 70 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 216
R.M.S. TITANIC - THE SAMUEL ALFRED SMITH ARCHIVE: Original copy of The Western Union News featuring Capt. de Carteret, handwritten letter from Mr Smith, period photo of him on board the Minia. Notation to reverse December 29th 1918. 'Notice how happy we all look'. Archival folder of letters and photos relating to Mr Smith, his work and family. Also, a series of copies of images of the Minia, etc.
Estimate:  £80 - 120 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 217
OCEAN LINER: Rare copy of the 1912 Stokers Manual.
Estimate:  £50 - 80 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 218
R.M.S. TITANIC: 1935 first edition of Titanic and Other Ships, loose spine.

Estimate:  £80 - 120 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 219
BOOKS: Lawrence Beesley 1912 copy of The Loss of The Titanic, some wear to bindings.
Estimate:  £50 - 80 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 220
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual Carlton ware memorial commemorative thimble cup, formerly the property of Brian Ticehurst. 1¾ins.
Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 221
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual Carlton ware memorial commemorative jug, formerly the property of Brian Ticehurst. 2¼ins.
Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 222
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual Carlton ware memorial commemorative vase, formerly the property of Brian Ticehurst. 2ins.
Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 223
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual Carlton ware memorial commemorative vase, formerly the property of Brian Ticehurst. 3ins.
Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 224
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unusual Carlton ware memorial commemorative beaker, formerly the property of Brian Ticehurst. 3¼ins.
Estimate:  £100 - 150 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 225
R.M.S. TITANIC: Period postcards to include the loss of The White Star liner Titanic, plus solely the back of a postcard (front blank) 16th April 1912, where the writer mentions 'will tell you why I did not sail on the Titanic'. (4)

Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 226
R.M.S. TITANIC: Blue soft bound copy of the report into the formal investigation into the loss of the Titanic, printed HMSO 1912. Front and back covers detached but present.
Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 226A
R.M.S. TITANIC: Valentine's series post-disaster Titanic postcards, plus Nearer My God to Thee. (4)

Estimate:  £60 - 80 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 227
R.M.S. TITANIC: St. Paul's Cathedral memorial service programme Friday 19th April 1912, losses to back page. Plus a collection of period Titanic newspaper cuttings.
Estimate:  £80 - 120 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 228
R.M.S. TITANIC: The Daily Mirror issues dated April 17th and April 18th 1912. Also included is a copy of the 20th April, without cover and The Daily Graphic.

Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 229
R.M.S. TITANIC: Daily Mirror issues, April 22nd, 23rd, and 24th 1912.
Estimate:  £120 - 180 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 230
R.M.S. TITANIC: Extremely rare money order from Ahernes Exchange and Shipping Office in Queenstown dated 9-4-12. The order is from the Admiralty for 450 dollars and forwarded by registered mail with red stamp 'Next ship calling' Titanic. 8½ins. x 5½ins.

Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 231
R.M.S. TITANIC/OLYMPIC - ORIGINAL WHITE STAR LINE OLYMPIC & TITANIC BROCHURE OF ACCOMMODATIONS AND ARRANGEMENTS: One of the finest examples known of the rarest Titanic brochure. Printed over 72 pages with a striking red cover with "Olympic and Titanic 45,000 Tons Each" in block-white lettering and an image of the vessel underway, printed by Liverpool Printing and Stationery Co Ltd. Published May 1911, likely to coincide with Titanic's launch. Proudly displayed below the ship's name on the title page is, "Designed, Built and Engineered by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast".
The brochure begins with the achievements the two sisters represent and how they were built side by side at Harland & Wolff. The vessels are then described, beginning with the hull, then the decorations and, finally, the machinery. The information contained in these sections is more than informative, from technical data on the watertight doors to the mechanics of the engines and just about everything in-between.
Accommodations for each class are described in detail. Descriptions of various amenities of the ship are also included.
For example, on page 39 a portion of the Grand Staircase is described as follows: "Above all a great dome of iron and glass throws a flood of light down the stairway, and on the landing beneath a great carved panel gives its note of richness to the otherwise plain and massive construction of the wall." The symbolism of the staircase's renowned clock is also discussed.
The text is complemented by 49 illustrations and photographs, some of which may not easily be found elsewhere. The Grand Staircase (referred to as the Main Staircase), Dining Saloon, Turkish Bath, Smoking Room, Pool (referred to as the Swimming Bath), each class of cabin, stages of building …… and machinery are all beautifully depicted throughout the brochure.
Estimate:  £8000 - 12000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 232
R.M.S. TITANIC: Rare pre-sinking bookpost Signal Series, real photo postcard postally used February 10th 1912 "Dear Father, I'm over in Belfast on the Titanic, hope you are both keeping quite well. Herbert." For condition please refer to photographs as condition although readable is poor.

Estimate:  £700 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 233
R.M.S. CARPATHIA: Real photo postcard of Harold Cottam, the wireless operator on board the Carpathia and the first person to receive the call for help from the Titanic.
Estimate:  £300 - 500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 234
R.M.S. TITANIC - BOOKS: In Memoriam Titanic Disaster rare 1913 private printing by H. Rea Woodman. (1)
Estimate:  £80 - 120 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 235
R.M.S. TITANIC: An important archive sold via direct descent relating to Second-Class passenger Marion Wright, a 26 year old who was travelling from Yeovil, Somerset to Oregon. The archive consists of a superlative handwritten letter over five pages that gives a graphic account of the sinking of the Titanic, together with a group of letters written shortly after the Titanic disaster to Marion's parents by relatives and friends, including one from her father Thomas to her mother. These give a unique snapshot into the mindset of parents of a passenger on the ship. The letter from her father dated 17th April starts "I have for the last two days been in a sort of listless bewildered coma". The highlight of the archive is written in black ink and transcribed in part:
"Copy
About 600 miles from New York
SS Carpathia - Cunard Line
April 16th 1912
Dearest Dad and all I love,
How can I express in a letter the time I have had since I've said goodbye but thank God I am saved and alive to write a few lines. We all had such a happy Sunday together service by the purser in the morning, I sang 2 songs There is a Green Hill and Nearer my God to Thee. In the evening I sang them again to a great number of passengers who had assembled in the drawing salon for hymns and a few words that were spoken by the only Church of England clergyman on board Rev. Carter, Rector of St Jude's Whitechapel who was with his wife. We all had supper together and sat talking with my chum of the boat Miss Kate Buss who is going on to California to be married. I didn't go to my berth until after 11:00 PM".
"It was terrible I don't think I will ever forget it I'd been in bed about 10 minutes when I heard a horrific crash which shook the whole vessel and the engine stopped dead I put on my dressing gown and a thick coat, I met my friend going on deck to find a reason for the crash. I was met on deck by a gentleman to whom I had often seen he said an iceberg has struck us but there is no danger, it was so cold I had been in the aft just freezing. One or two people had remarked we are in the region of icebergs this one they said was towering right above the vessel I didn't stay up many minutes, we went down again to get more clothing as I didn't feel I could possibly go to bed. At least the engines were going I brought my rug and clothes to E Deck where we met a steward who said all put on life belts, I put mine on saddled the petticoat to my dress, a dressing gown, long coat and woollen coat with my hat. There with my rug, gold chain, bracelet, 2 silver bangles, engagement ring and another small ring all that is saved but I am saved and for that I'm thankful. The Titanic struck the iceberg about 11:45 by 12:15 we were in a boat load including myself and several more people to whom I had spoken to, I mention a Scotch lady and a little girl who are going to Portland OR who have been so kind to me they're being met by her brother in New York who says he will look after me and see me married that should be when I see Arthur. I can't express my mind is so much in a muddle I thank God for being preserved so mercifully my heart goes out to all who were drowned Alfred Paine, Mr Whitby's nephew, Yeovil people who put me in a lifeboat he was such a nice man and I fear. I don't think we quite knew what was coming when we got into the boat we were on board for about 12:00 o'clock till 6:30 AM it didn't seem so long the dawn came very quickly and oh I was glad when we saw the Cunard boat it seemed almost too good to be true. Everybody has been so kind all the passengers have been giving us clothes and officers and crew have given us all attention for which we are truly thankful. The Titanic must have had her bottom taken away from first class to the steerage for she went down gradually bit by bit it was awful to watch her. We saw the crowds of people when she broke in two which she did a few minutes before she sank going down with a huge explosion over the cries of the people left on board. It was heart rending I didn't know how far we were from the Titanic as she sank, but we kept on asking the men to row further away and they did when she went down they pulled so hard that after seeing lots of boats around they drifted and rested the stars were glorious. It was bitterly cold and the icebergs were all around we had been watching we saw the boat as the men rowed as hard as they could we should have cither sic. at 3:30 and got there in 2 hours there were 35 of us in the boat and only six men who could pull or man an oar I longed to take one but it was so crowded the life belts were God sent to us. April the 18th I'm afraid this letter is very dirty but you'll forgive me but I have to carry everything and everything in my long coat pocket a gentleman is given me". The letter continues for a further page and a half.
NB. The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich holds an extensive archive relating to Miss Wright.
Estimate:  £5000 - 6000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 236
R.M.S. CARPATHIA TITANIC-RELATED SALVAGE ITEMS
The following four lots consist of items salvaged from the R.M.S. Carpathia and were involved in Carpathia's rescue of over 700 survivors of the Titanic disaster on the morning of 15th April, 1912.
The Carpathia was a Cunard Line transatlantic passenger steamship built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson in Wallsend, Liverpool, Tyne and Wear in England in 1903. She is best known as the ship which rescued all of Titanic's survivors. In the early morning of 15th April, 1912 the Carpathia's radio operator, Harold Cottam, received a message from Titanic that it had struck an iceberg. After bringing the message to the ship's master, Captain Arthur Rostron, Rostron took immediate steps to steam to Titanic's reported position calling on additional stokers to make all possible speed. He ordered the ship's heating and hot water cut off to provide as much steam as possible to the engines. After navigating around an ice field, Carpathia reached Titanic's position at about 4:00 A.M., a little more than an hour and a half after Titanic went down. Carpathia arrived in New York on 18th April, 1912 where Titanic's survivors disembarked and the Carpathia resumed its regular voyage to the Mediterranean.
After being pressed into service during World War I by the British Admiralty, Carpathia was sunk on 17th July, 1918 by three torpedoes fired by U-55 of the German Imperial Navy around 120 miles west of Fastnet.
Carpathia was discovered lying in an upright position at a depth of about 500 feet of water 120 miles west of Fastnet, Ireland. Exploring it posed some difficulty. While there are rare cases of commercial divers briefly reaching depths of 1000 feet, 500 feet represents the more realistic limit of human tolerance for deep sea divers, imposing a heavy decompression penalty of five hours.
Numerous dives were made in August and September 2007 to recover Carpathia's artifacts from the debris field. Over 90 artifacts were recovered including some involved in Carpathia's rescue of Titanic's survivors. Such are the artifacts offered here. The following five lots are unparalleled: An engine order telegraph from Carpathia's bridge used to signal the engine room; a lamp which would have lighted the way for survivors in the dark; a port hole which still opens and closes; and a six-inch wide floor tile.
These lots have seen no equal. In terms of historical importance they can be equated with such items as Wallace Hartley's violin and Titanic's crow's nest bell. The financial investment, the Herculean effort and the risk to human life involved in recovering these artifacts from the ocean floor is a testament to how important it was to preserve the history and tangible evidence of Carpathia's rescue of Titanic's survivors. None of these items have ever been on public display. But future possibilities are endless.
The following lots have been conserved, but not restored. You see them as they were on the ocean floor. A collection which includes Carpathia's rescue-related engine order telegraph, porthole, deck lamp, or floor tile would be worthy of world class recognition.
Every lot is accompanied by a frame-worthy original Certificate of Authenticity signed by expedition leader P.H. Nargeolet who also led several expeditions to Titanic's wreck site. Each lot bears a later added unobtrusive inked-in accession number. For a more detailed condition report please refer to the images, or telephone during business hours.


R.M.S. Titanic/Ocean Liner/R.M.S. Carpathia, Salvaged Engine Order Telegraph on Base
Today, modern vessels have a throttle on the bridge for the direct control of the engines without any involvement of engine room personnel. In Titanic's time, bridge personnel would have to move the pointer on the telegraph to the desired speed. This would trigger an "alarm" bell in the engine room which signalled an incoming engine order from the bridge. In the case of the rescue of the Titanic's surviving passengers and crew, this ship's telegraph was an integral part of one of the most famous events of the 20th century. Captain Rostron set a course for Titanic upon receiving the distress calls. He then sent for his chief engineer and told him to "call another watch of stokers and make all possible speed to the Titanic".
The pointer of the engine room telegraph would move to the position on the dial which was selected by the bridge such as Full Ahead, Half Ahead, Slow Ahead, Stop, Slow Astern, etc. The engineers would signal receipt of the order by moving the engine room pointer lever to the same position which would trigger a bell to ring in the bridge's telegraph. The engineers would then bring the engines to the desired speed. In an emergency, such as an order for an emergency stop, bridge personnel would bring the lever to the "stop" position three times. This would result in an equal number of rings in the engine room telegraph signaling an urgent request.
The telegraph was manufactured by A. Robinson & Co. Ltd, Liverpool & Glasgow with maker's plaque present. The telegraph top was recovered on 29th August, 2007 by a deep wreck diver using a lift bag. The base was recovered on 28th August, 2007 with a crane from the Janus II research vessel. The artifact exhibits expected pitting, dents and losses. The door to the base is attached and bulges slightly. Some of the original glass is present and intact. Four later mounts have been added to the base for display purposes. Internal workings including the alarm bell are present as is one lever. Approximately 48ins tall. Quite simply an exceptional piece of memorabilia and was an essential part of the Carpathia's endeavours to reach the Titanic's survivors.

Estimate:  £50000 - 80000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 237
R.M.S. Titanic/Ocean Liner/R.M.S. Carpathia, Salvaged Porthole with Partial Wood
Most portholes are round. They are placed in the hull of a ship as a window to admit light and sometimes they open to let in fresh air. They also provide passengers an opportunity to look outside.
This lot consists of a round porthole, bronze, with interior glass window and attached partial wood substructure. The window is hinged which allows it to open and close. Amazingly, the mechanism is in working order and the porthole can be displayed in either the open or closed position.
The porthole was recovered on 28th August, 2007 by the Achilles Rover, with a crane from the Janus II research vessel. The hinge is marked "89." It measures approximately 7¾ins (h) x 24¾ins (w) x 16ins (d) when opened.
An artifact large in size and importance from the hull of the ship that rescued Titanic's survivors. One can only imagine the relief felt by the survivors in their lifeboats as they saw the lights of Carpathia shining through the portholes in the distance. The possibilities for display, open or closed, are endless. Unmistakable for what it is, it is immediately recognizable to anyone as a ship's porthole, that witnessed one of the most famous rescues of the 20th cent.
Estimate:  £20000 - 30000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 238
R.M.S. Titanic/Ocean Liner/R.M.S. Carpathia, Salvaged Deck Lamp with Globe (2 Pcs.)
Salvaged brass/bronze electric deck lamp with a colourless glass globe secured by a cage with wooden fragments from the ship. The socket is marked "_diswan." The Ediswan Electric Light Company was founded in the UK towards the end of the 19th century as a collaboration between the American inventor Thomas Edison and the British inventor Joseph Swan who each lay claim to inventing the electric light.
Prior to the advent of the electric light, lamps on the decks of ships used candlelight. A globe such as this one would have been placed around the candle to shield it from the wind; thus the nickname hurricane lamp. One could only imagine how this electric "hurricane lamp" may have lighted the way for Titanic's survivors in the dark.
The lamp was recovered by the Achilles Rover on 26th August, 2007 using an ROV basket. It is nothing short of miraculous that this fragile lamp managed to survive Carpathia's sinking.
The globe has some losses and cracks. The cage was separated but is now secured. Some staining and pitting and one screw is loose. There is some wear and losses to the wooden elements. Approximately 8½ins (h), 5ins (dia.) Untested.
Estimate:  £12000 - 18000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 238A
R.M.S. Carpathia, Salvaged Red Octagonal Floor Tile
Patterned earthenware floor tile from an unknown location on the ship, approx. ⅞ins (d) x 5⅞?ins (w) x 6ins (dia.) Given its sturdy structure, its depth and its weight, it would appear to be from a high traffic area on board. While a kitchen area would seem possible, its pattern more likely suggests that it came from a well-travelled passenger area.
The tile was recovered on 1st September 2007 by the Achilles Rover using an ROV basket. There is a remnant of a marine encrustation and some losses to the edges.
Estimate:  £1500 - 2500 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 239
R.M.S. TITANIC: EXTREMELY IMPORTANT RECORD OF TITANIC BODIES AND EFFECTS RELATED TO JOHN JACOB ASTOR IV
The Commercial Cable Company steamer Mackay-Bennett was the first vessel chartered by the White Star Line in the aftermath of the sinking for the gruesome task of locating and recovering the bodies of Titanic's dead. Of the 306 bodies which were recovered during the Mackay-Bennett's seven-day search, 116 were buried at sea and 190 were brought back to Halifax to a make-shift morgue.
To document each body recovered, the provincial coroner of Nova Scotia prepared a list of all 306 bodies, including their clothing and personal effects, headed, "Record of Bodies and Effects, (Passengers and Crew S.S. "Titanic"), Recovered by Cable Steamer "Mackay-Bennett" including Bodies Buried at Sea and Bodies Delivered at Morgue in Halifax, N.S., Details Compiled from Records of the "Mackay-Bennett." The list was not prepared for public dissemination but was created to provide an accurate, official record of the victims and to help in making any future identifications, as the entries also included physical descriptions.

The list contains details on such notable victims as John Jacob Astor IV of New York (Body No. 124), the richest man on board, responsible for many iconic institutions including New York's Astoria, later Waldorf-Astoria, Hotel. There is mention also of Isidor Straus (Body No. 96) of Macy's Department Store.
After Astor's body was brought to Halifax, the captain of his yacht Noma, Richard Roberts, was sent by Astor's family to identify the body. Upon seeing it, Richards said, "It is he." This very list was subsequently obtained by Roberts. It is the only such list of which we are aware that was given to a victim's representative, likely owing to the importance of the Astor name. The name R. Roberts with his Brooklyn, New York address is pencilled onto the free end page, in another hand on the back of the last page is Miss Lalla Roberts, also of Brooklyn. The list remained in the Brooklyn, New York area until recently.
The first page is a key showing how the recovered bodies were disposed of, with numerous small numerical pencil notations added next to each key. The list consists of about 75 pages. The front and back purple covers are detached as is the last page containing entries for Body Nos. 303-306. The last page and both covers have some losses not affecting text. The interior is clean and provides a primary source of body recovery information, as the list was officially prepared by the provincial coroner. It is an important piece of the body recovery aspect of the sinking and of Titanic's overall story, with the exceptional additional aspect of being related to John Jacob Astor. Astor is buried in Trinity Church Cemetery in New York City.
Approx. 8½ins. x 13ins. Original binding consists of nothing more than two paper clips at the top. A singularly important piece of history directly related to one of the most high profile and important men on the Titanic
Estimate:  £12000 - 18000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 240
R.M.S. TITANIC: EXTRAORDINARILY RARE ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF TITANIC CHIEF WIRELESS OPERATOR JOHN GEORGE "JACK" PHILLIPS IN MARCONI UNIFORM WITH PHOTOGRAPHER'S MOUNT
An original rare matte-finish silver gelatin photo of Titanic's senior wireless operator who died in the sinking, circa 1910. The mount bears the photographer's imprint of Jennie Stedman, Melrose Studio, Farncombe [Godalming, Surrey, England]. A chest-length stately image of the dapper Phillips depicted in his Marconi uniform, arms crossed holding a pair of uniform gloves in one hand. The distinctive "M" [Marconi] is visible on his cap.
Phillips was born in Farncombe in 1887 and began his career in telegraphy working at the local post office in 1902. Having later worked on other White Star Line ships, he was assigned to Titanic for her maiden voyage as an employee of the Marconi Company. After Titanic hit the iceberg he and the junior wireless operator Harold Bride worked tirelessly sending out distress signals. If it were not for their unyielding efforts, rescue ships would not have been alerted to Titanic's need for assistance. Yet, despite Phillips' pivotal role in Titanic's story, very little relating to him has come into collectors' hands.
Little is generally known about the photographer Jennie Stedman. It was unusual, if not unheard of, for a woman to be in that profession in those days. It is possible that Phillips knew her as her studio was in his home town. The image of Phillips from this photograph is well known but we are aware of only one other original in private hands, though the example offered here is in a larger format. A large painted portrait of this image hung as a memorial to Phillips in the post office where he got his start and is now on display at the Godalming Museum. We are aware of another pose of Phillips taken by Stedman, that one full length, likely from the same sitting, which is held at The National Archives, Kew, though that image shows Phillips from a greater distance. The image size of this pose offered here may be unique.
The image measures 6¼ins. x 4⅜?ins. With an overall size of 7⅞?ins. x 5⅛ins. and has razor sharp clarity.
There are some light pencil notations about Phillips on verso. This spectacular original image of Phillips in his Marconi uniform is not one to pass up. As our late friend Ken Schultz was fond of asking: When will you ever see another;
Estimate:  £6000 - 10000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 240A
R.M.S. TITANIC: First-Class passenger and victim Erwin G. Levy. Handwritten postcard postally used prior to Titanic s departure Erwin was a jeweller from Arkansas who was in Europe on a diamond buying trip, in part 'have also shipped some exquisitely designed diamond jewellery from here, Leave for Amsterdam tomorrow.'
Estimate:  £500 - 800 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 241
R.M.S. TITANIC: Unique yellow metal locket owned by Wallace Hartley's fiancée Maria Robinson and given to her by the Titanic's band leader Wallace Hartley. It is engraved with an intertwined M R and contains a stunning photograph of Wallace. The locket is sold via direct descent, having been given to the vendor's mother, Maria's niece, upon her death in 1939. It has remained in the family since. The locket accompanied by a letter of provenance from Maria's great nephew detailing it's provenance and history 'The locket was an engagement or birthday gift from Wallace Hartley to his fiancee Maria Robinson, it was retained by Maria after Wallace's tragic death until it was passed to my mother when Maria died in 1939.'
NB. Henry Aldridge sold Wallace Hartley's violin in October 2013 for a world record £900,000. It bore an engraved fishplate 'For Wallace on the occasion of our engagement from Maria'.
Estimate:  £15000 - 20000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 242
R.M.S. TITANIC: A superb four-page letter written on board the Titanic in several stages, dated April 10th 1912 but finished a day later. It is written by Second-Class passenger Henry Cotterill, aged 21, he was travelling from Penzance, Cornwall and shared a cabin with his friends Percy Bailey and George Hocking. The letter in part reads 'Dear Mother, I am sending a few lines to let you know we are all getting on alright and are having a fine time, plenty to eat and drink so you don't want to worry. I have sent on a photo of the boat and I never saw such a thing in my life it's like a floating town and the rooms you can eat the meat from the floors and everything shining like silver.' Henry then talks about the journey to reach Southampton on the train. He then restarts the letter 'I am writing this letter onboard the boat and it is a bit rough but I am a good sailor so far. I cannot stay to write much more now as I want to catch the mail at Queenstown. I am alright will write at New York so cheer up your loving son Henry. So tell the boys I am a good sailor so far but got plenty of wind.' Also included in the lot is a letter to Henry's mother from The National Disaster Relief Fund to Mrs E. Cotterill dated 1st June 1940, and an In Memoriam press cutting.

Estimate:  £12000 - 18000 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 243
R.M.S. TITANIC: Original press photograph of Titanic victim Isidor Straus by Pach Brothers, the famous New York photo studio. The photograph is mounted on heavy stock card with various notations and stamps on reverse, including one indicating it was published in the Literary Digest on 27th April 1912. Approximately 4ins. x 5½ins. Ex-Brown Brothers.
Estimate:  £700 - 1200 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
Lot 244
R.M.S. OLYMPIC: Extremely rare original glass-plate negative showing a rare image of Olympic's First-Class elevators on D Deck, taken in May 1912 during Olympic's first visit to New York after the Titanic disaster. This unique image shows inside the elevator cab including reflection of "D Deck". Large glass-plate negative, approximately 6½ins. x 8½ins. Ex-Brown Brothers.

Estimate:  £600 - 700 Click here for details of BP and other fees payable on this lot.
  
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